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Windows XP Reboot Loop: Help! [Solved/Closed]

ttotheizzay - Latest answer on Oct 18, 2012 11:15AM
my computer is stuck in a reboot loop. i have an intel pentium 4 desktop computer. it is windows xp home edition. the problem happened after i installed the windows service package 2 (i know, im a little behind). it seemed to install the update fine but after i restarted my computer i couldnt seem to get to my desktop. the computer manages to get to the light blue windows xp loading screen but instead of entering my desktop the computer reboots and the whole process starts over again. after reading other forums, i tried the F8 method but couldnt seem to make it work. last known configuration and safe mode dont seem to work but i may have not done them correctly; im no computer whiz. but after pressing the "disable automatic restart on system failure" option, i got this error message on the "blue screen of death" (this happened after the light blue xp loading screen instead of it restarting like it usually does):
STOP: c000021a Unknown Hard Error
Unknown Hard Error
what should i do? i dont want to have to reinstall windows xp and lose my data as i have some important documents and music mp3s on it. ive read about possibly doing a repair install? how does that work, would it work, and would it save my data? is there another option? thanks in advance.
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Answer
+161
moins plus
it has to do with your registry after installing sp3,i had it and fixed it myself,below is what i did after going on in safe mode. HOW TO STOP ENDLESS LOOP REBOOT FROM SP3 1.) First, boot into Safe Mode. After a reboot or two, you'll probably be given that option, but if not, just tap the F8 key a few times once you see the Windows logo pop up on your screen. 2.) Once you're in Safe Mode, go to Start, Run and type in "regedit" (without the quotes). 3.) That will launch the Registry Editor. Next, you'll need to navigate to: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Services\Intelppm4.) Once you're there, look in the right hand side pane for an entry that says Start. Right click it and select Modify.5.) In the Value Data box, replace the 1 with a 4. Hit OK to exit the Registry Editor and then reboot your computer.

JJ- Jun 4, 2010 11:15PM
it doesn't let me in safe mode
nidhi- Jun 5, 2010 03:38PM
i have done the same .. but my problem is still not solved.. :(
SkyBrain- Jul 18, 2010 11:23PM
your welcome dude :D i'm glad if the problems gone too....Nice hahahaha
Jdizzle- Aug 3, 2010 11:39PM
I'm super curious on why this works, because it did for me! You're great.
sydneyshark- Oct 18, 2012 11:15AM
yes so good for me windows start now thank you for your tips
Answer
+154
moins plus
This is how I fixed my reboot prob...I took my computer out in the driveway and booted it into oncoming traffic. I then went down the the store and bought a new computer. No file on that computer is worth an ounce of my sanity! Hope this helps.

dizzedee- Jun 14, 2010 10:07PM
this is by far the best solution yet!!!!!
Answer
+29
moins plus
When the computer restarts, press F8 and select safe mode.
It will switch to a black screen with script-like running.
Look at the bottom for "press Esc to .....sptd.sys"
press Esc immediately.
It will then bring a dialog box about running it on safe mode. Press ok. If system restore window comes up, close it. By now you should see your desk top in safe mode.

Go to
"C:\WINDOWS\systems32\drivers\sptd
Rename sptd file to sp....td or anything you will remember
Restart your Comp

Answer
+20
moins plus
When the computer restarts, press F8 and select safe mode.
It will switch to a black screen with script-like running.
Look at the bottom for "press Esc to .....sptd.sys"
press Esc immediately.
It will then bring a dialog box about running it on safe mode. Press ok. If system restore window comes up, close it. By now you should see your desk top in safe mode.

Go to
"C:\WINDOWS\systems32\drivers\sptd
Rename sptd file to sp....td or anything you will remember
Restart your Comp

Answer
+13
moins plus
Hi,

Let us try to repair windows.
Insert your Windows XP CD and restart the computer.
The Windows Installation wizard will appear.
Carefully proceed, till you find an option to "Repair...."
Click on Repair. Let it complete. This should fix our issue.

Note : IF CD is not detected automatically, you have to re-set BIOS configuration.
Press Del or F10 (depends) when the system starts and then set the Boot Priority.
Here make sure, CD drive is before Harddrive.

All the best.
Allwyn

steve- Mar 11, 2010 06:16PM
Hi,

Would this procedure delete everything I had on my PC or would it save the files like my music and videos?

Thanks
patlyn- Mar 11, 2010 07:34PM
Steve, are you talking about System Recovery? (On Windows XP Home Edition? If you are, the Program SAVES all your Personal Files before it places a New Factory Fresh Copy of Windows Home Edition on your Hard drive.
It then Re-Installs all your Personal Files to the NEW COPY of Windows Home Edition.
Patlyn
LuisGbK- Apr 22, 2010 04:46AM
Hi
people, where can i find this cd hat Allwyn talked about? if it's suposed to come with the computer, I already lost it, so where can I find that software online?
sammy d- May 1, 2010 09:37AM
hi i have a compaq with xp home and i have this problem where when i start the computer it says configuring updates within about 20 seconds of that it shuts down and restarts again. i have gone through the full f8 menu and f10 tryed everything i think i can and now im stuck. could someone please point me in the right direction please. incase i loose this site again could you please drop me a link to a download or something i can use cheers. Email id removed for security
tazam 2Posts Sunday July 11, 2010Registration date July 11, 2010Last seen - Jul 11, 2010 01:01PM
Hi there - I've got the CD and have changed the BIOS order, but the PC is still booting from the hard drive. This is an old Compaq NX9005 that I'm attempting to reset to the factory settings (but the system restore doesn;t go back far enough). Any suggestions?
Answer
+13
moins plus
Hi there. I read a lot of posts from various forums but in the end tried my own method for fixing the problem which has fixed other Windows issues in the past. It, seems the Windows registry controls this restart looping process.

What I did was booted in the Recovery Console using a Win XP Home CD (a home CD will let you fix Home or Pro apparently.) I used the following process to get the computer to a workable state:


To complete part one, follow these steps:
Insert the Windows XP startup disk into the floppy disk drive, or insert the Windows XP CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive, and then restart the computer.
Click to select any options that are required to start the computer from the CD-ROM drive if you are prompted to do so.
When the "Welcome to Setup" screen appears, press R to start the Recovery Console.
If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot computer, select the installation that you want to access from the Recovery Console.
When you are prompted to do so, type the Administrator password. If the administrator password is blank, just press ENTER.
At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
md tmp
copy c:\windows\system32\config\system c:\windows\tmp\system.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\software c:\windows\tmp\software.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\sam c:\windows\tmp\sam.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\security c:\windows\tmp\security.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\default c:\windows\tmp\default.bak

delete c:\windows\system32\config\system
delete c:\windows\system32\config\software
delete c:\windows\system32\config\sam
delete c:\windows\system32\config\security
delete c:\windows\system32\config\default

copy c:\windows\repair\system c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\repair\software c:\windows\system32\config\software
copy c:\windows\repair\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam
copy c:\windows\repair\security c:\windows\system32\config\security
copy c:\windows\repair\default c:\windows\system32\config\default

Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer will restart.
Note This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step five, and then create a text file called "Regcopy1.txt" (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy1.txt
With the batch command in Recovery Console, you can process all the commands in a text file sequentially. When you use the batch command, you do not have to manually type as many commands.
Part two
To complete the procedure described in this section, you must be logged on as an administrator, or an administrative user (a user who has an account in the Administrators group). If you are using Windows XP Home Edition, you can log on as an administrative user. If you log on as an administrator, you must first start Windows XP Home Edition in Safe mode. To start the Windows XP Home Edition computer in Safe mode, follow these steps.

Note Print these instructions before you continue. You cannot view these instructions after you restart the computer in Safe Mode. If you use the NTFS file system, also print the instructions from Knowledge Base article KB309531. Step 7 contains a reference to the article.
Click Start, click Shut Down (or click Turn Off Computer), click Restart, and then click OK (or click Restart).
Press the F8 key.

On a computer that is configured to start to multiple operating systems, you can press F8 when you see the Startup menu.
Use the arrow keys to select the appropriate Safe mode option, and then press ENTER.
If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot system, use the arrow keys to select the installation that you want to access, and then press ENTER.
In part two, you copy the registry files from their backed up location by using System Restore. This folder is not available in Recovery Console and is generally not visible during typical usage. Before you start this procedure, you must change several settings to make the folder visible:
Start Windows Explorer.
On the Tools menu, click Folder options.
Click the View tab.
Under Hidden files and folders, click to select Show hidden files and folders, and then click to clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box.
Click Yes when the dialog box that confirms that you want to display these files appears.
Double-click the drive where you installed Windows XP to display a list of the folders. If is important to click the correct drive.
Open the System Volume Information folder. This folder is unavailable and appears dimmed because it is set as a super-hidden folder.

Note This folder contains one or more _restore {GUID} folders such as "_restore{87BD3667-3246-476B-923F-F86E30B3E7F8}".

Note You may receive the following error message:
C:\System Volume Information is not accessible. Access is denied.
If you receive this message, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article to gain access to this folder and continue with the procedure:
309531 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309531/ ) How to gain access to the System Volume Information folder
Open a folder that was not created at the current time. You may have to click Details on the View menu to see when these folders were created. There may be one or more folders starting with "RPx under this folder. These are restore points.
Open one of these folders to locate a Snapshot subfolder. The following path is an example of a folder path to the Snapshot folder:
C:\System Volume Information\_restore{D86480E3-73EF-47BC-A0EB-A81BE6EE3ED8}\RP1\Snapshot
From the Snapshot folder, copy the following files to the C:\Windows\Tmp folder:
_REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM
Rename the files in the C:\Windows\Tmp folder as follows:
Rename _REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT to DEFAULT
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY to SECURITY
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE to SOFTWARE
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM to SYSTEM
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM to SAM
These files are the backed up registry files from System Restore. Because you used the registry file that the Setup program created, this registry does not know that these restore points exist and are available. A new folder is created with a new GUID under System Volume Information and a restore point is created that includes a copy of the registry files that were copied during part one. Therefore, it is important not to use the most current folder, especially if the time stamp on the folder is the same as the current time.

The current system configuration is not aware of the previous restore points. You must have a previous copy of the registry from a previous restore point to make the previous restore points available again.

The registry files that were copied to the Tmp folder in the C:\Windows folder are moved to make sure that the files are available under Recovery Console. You must use these files to replace the registry files currently in the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder. By default, Recovery Console has limited folder access and cannot copy files from the System Volume folder.

Note The procedure described in this section assumes that you are running your computer with the FAT32 file system. For more information about how to access the System Volume Information Folder with the NTFS file system, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
309531 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309531/ ) How to gain access to the System Volume Information folder
Part Three
In part three, you delete the existing registry files, and then copy the System Restore Registry files to the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder:
Start Recovery Console.
At the command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
del c:\windows\system32\config\sam

del c:\windows\system32\config\security

del c:\windows\system32\config\software

del c:\windows\system32\config\default

del c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\software c:\windows\system32\config\software

copy c:\windows\tmp\system c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam

copy c:\windows\tmp\security c:\windows\system32\config\security

copy c:\windows\tmp\default c:\windows\system32\config\default
Note Some of these command lines may be wrapped for readability.
Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer restarts.
Note This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step two, and then create a text file called "Regcopy2.txt" (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy2.txt
Part Four
Click Start, and then click All Programs.
Click Accessories, and then click System Tools.
Click System Restore, and then click Restore to a previous RestorePoint.


With the computer I fixed, I had no restore points. Not sure if you will have restore points available or not. Anyway, I actually ran a Windows repair over the installation and that got it working well enough to troubleshoot any further little problems.

To do a Windows repair, you'll need to boot with the XP CD and in some cases you'll need a product key.



Hope this helps someone.


Daniel.

Answer
+5
moins plus
When the computer restarts, press F8 and select safe mode.
It will switch to a black screen with script-like running.
Look at the bottom for "press Esc to .....sptd.sys"
press Esc immediately.
It will then bring a dialog box about running it on safe mode. Press ok. If system restore window comes up, close it. By now you should see your desk top in safe mode.

Go to
"C:\WINDOWS\systems32\drivers\sptd
Rename sptd file to sp....td or anything you will remember
Restart your Comp

Answer
+3
moins plus
HELP!!!!!!!!!! I have no idea how this happened but I opened excel viewed my file made changes saved it and I thought I closed it. Anyhow the next day I open excel try to open my file which opens with no problem but POOOF all my information is GONE!!!!!!!!!! Someone please help me figure out how to get all my info back. It was only 2 days ago. I can be reached at Email id removed for security thanks all

Jessica

Answer
+3
moins plus
Start your computer in safemode and type msconfig in run command, then window will display, click startup tab and see which programs are start with your computer start in normal mode. if there is a command of " shutdown -k" or same kind , copy it and then run registry by typing regedit on run command and then go to find and paste it then searh it when you find such a command delete it then find next until no more found appear. then restart your computer.
Hope it will solve your problem. And remember don't forget to uncheck the startup command where you see that path ok..... If anybody have further any issue about computer please contact me at www.diggz.webs.com

Answer
+3
moins plus
Try this solution:



Insert a Windows XP startup disk into the floppy disk drive, or insert the Windows XP CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive, and then restart the computer.
Click to select any options that are required to start the computer from the CD-ROM drive if you are prompted to do so.
When the "Welcome to Setup" screen appears, press R to start the Recovery Console.
If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot computer, select the installation that you want to access from the Recovery Console.
When you are prompted to do so, type the Administrator password. If the administrator password is blank, just press ENTER.
At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
md tmp
copy c:\windows\system32\config\system c:\windows\tmp\system.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\software c:\windows\tmp\software.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\sam c:\windows\tmp\sam.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\security c:\windows\tmp\security.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\default c:\windows\tmp\default.bak

delete c:\windows\system32\config\system
delete c:\windows\system32\config\software
delete c:\windows\system32\config\sam
delete c:\windows\system32\config\security
delete c:\windows\system32\config\default

copy c:\windows\repair\system c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\repair\software c:\windows\system32\config\software
copy c:\windows\repair\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam
copy c:\windows\repair\security c:\windows\system32\config\security
copy c:\windows\repair\default c:\windows\system32\config\default

Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer will restart.
Note This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step five, and then create a text file called "Regcopy1.txt" (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy1.txt
With the batch command in Recovery Console, you can process all the commands in a text file sequentially. When you use the batch command, you do not have to manually type as many commands.
Part two
To complete the procedure described in this section, you must be logged on as an administrator, or an administrative user (a user who has an account in the Administrators group). If you are using Windows XP Home Edition, you can log on as an administrative user. If you log on as an administrator, you must first start Windows XP Home Edition in Safe mode. To start the Windows XP Home Edition computer in Safe mode, follow these steps.

Note Print these instructions before you continue. You cannot view these instructions after you restart the computer in Safe Mode. If you use the NTFS file system, also print the instructions from Knowledge Base article KB309531. Step 7 contains a reference to the article.
Click Start, click Shut Down (or click Turn Off Computer), click Restart, and then click OK (or click Restart).
Press the F8 key.

On a computer that is configured to start to multiple operating systems, you can press F8 when you see the Startup menu.
Use the arrow keys to select the appropriate Safe mode option, and then press ENTER.
If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot system, use the arrow keys to select the installation that you want to access, and then press ENTER.
In part two, you copy the registry files from their backed up location by using System Restore. This folder is not available in Recovery Console and is generally not visible during typical usage. Before you start this procedure, you must change several settings to make the folder visible:
Start Windows Explorer.
On the Tools menu, click Folder options.
Click the View tab.
Under Hidden files and folders, click to select Show hidden files and folders, and then click to clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box.
Click Yes when the dialog box that confirms that you want to display these files appears.
Double-click the drive where you installed Windows XP to display a list of the folders. If is important to click the correct drive.
Open the System Volume Information folder. This folder is unavailable and appears dimmed because it is set as a super-hidden folder.

Note This folder contains one or more _restore {GUID} folders such as "_restore{87BD3667-3246-476B-923F-F86E30B3E7F8}".

Note You may receive the following error message:
C:\System Volume Information is not accessible. Access is denied.
If you receive this message, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article to gain access to this folder and continue with the procedure:
309531 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309531/ ) How to gain access to the System Volume Information folder
Open a folder that was not created at the current time. You may have to click Details on the View menu to see when these folders were created. There may be one or more folders starting with "RPx under this folder. These are restore points.
Open one of these folders to locate a Snapshot subfolder. The following path is an example of a folder path to the Snapshot folder:
C:\System Volume Information\_restore{D86480E3-73EF-47BC-A0EB-A81BE6EE3ED8}\RP1\Snapshot
From the Snapshot folder, copy the following files to the C:\Windows\Tmp folder:
_REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM
Rename the files in the C:\Windows\Tmp folder as follows:
Rename _REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT to DEFAULT
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY to SECURITY
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE to SOFTWARE
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM to SYSTEM
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM to SAM
These files are the backed up registry files from System Restore. Because you used the registry file that the Setup program created, this registry does not know that these restore points exist and are available. A new folder is created with a new GUID under System Volume Information and a restore point is created that includes a copy of the registry files that were copied during part one. Therefore, it is important not to use the most current folder, especially if the time stamp on the folder is the same as the current time.

The current system configuration is not aware of the previous restore points. You must have a previous copy of the registry from a previous restore point to make the previous restore points available again.

The registry files that were copied to the Tmp folder in the C:\Windows folder are moved to make sure that the files are available under Recovery Console. You must use these files to replace the registry files currently in the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder. By default, Recovery Console has limited folder access and cannot copy files from the System Volume folder.

Note The procedure described in this section assumes that you are running your computer with the FAT32 file system. For more information about how to access the System Volume Information Folder with the NTFS file system, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
309531 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309531/ ) How to gain access to the System Volume Information folder
Part Three
In part three, you delete the existing registry files, and then copy the System Restore Registry files to the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder:
Start Recovery Console.
At the command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
del c:\windows\system32\config\sam

del c:\windows\system32\config\security

del c:\windows\system32\config\software

del c:\windows\system32\config\default

del c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\software c:\windows\system32\config\software

copy c:\windows\tmp\system c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam

copy c:\windows\tmp\security c:\windows\system32\config\security

copy c:\windows\tmp\default c:\windows\system32\config\default
Note Some of these command lines may be wrapped for readability.
Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer restarts.
Note This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step two, and then create a text file called "Regcopy2.txt" (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy2.txt
Part Four
Click Start, and then click All Programs.
Click Accessories, and then click System Tools.
Click System Restore, and then click Restore to a previous RestorePoint.
Back to the top


Hope this helps someone!



Daniel.

JazzCat- Jun 16, 2010 03:25AM
Please note: when I got to the point of restoring using restore points, there were none. Not sure if this has something to do with the restart loop problem. At any rate, I did an XP repair on the system to get it to a more functional state. :)
Answer
+3
moins plus
my computer is getting restarted automatically when i am installing windows xp what shall i do

Answer
+2
moins plus
I had the same (or similar) problem, which caused me loads of anxiety over these past few days.
I have a Dell Dimension 5150 PC.
My symptoms: After Windows XP SP3 update, I experienced the same reboot loop. After disconnecting the keyboard/mouse, Windows loaded just fine. Plugging in a Wacom Tablet caused the same problem again. Plugging in the Printer: ditto. Not so with my external Hardrive. But without a keyboard or mouse, there is little you can do. So I took the PC tower to a local service tech (Dell Support wanted to reload the OS, but that would have ditched my files).

Service Tech at Computer Trends was able to fix the problem. I received my PC back this afternoon.
Here are his notes:
SYSTEM DID NOT UPDATE TO SP3 PROPERLY. MANUALLY COPIED USB FILES INTO %SYSTEMROOT%\SYSTEM32 FROM SERVICE PACK. SYSTEM NOW BOOTS WITHOUT BLUE SCREEN. ISSUE RESOLVED.

So, unless you know how to do that, don't screw around with it. Take it to a Service Technician. It cost me $ 50.-- plus tax.

Case closed.
Cheers and good luck

Richy06- Dec 9, 2009 08:24AM
Hi,
I just wanted to thank The Mystic for relating what he did. Thanks to that post and about 12 hours of research I finished by fixing my Dell Dimension 520.
After a SP3 update, I had a BSOD on each boot. I was never able to get to windows. I couldn't even put a XP boot disk whick also BSOD'd me after uploading the files. Incredibly, if I unplugged the USB keyboard and mouse The XP system completely charged correctly in normal mode, but as soon as I put the keyboard in I got the blue screen, so no way to do anything : non DOS, no recovery console, no windows, no keyboard, no nothing. The tech guys in Mystic's post wrote that they MANUALLY replaced the files that had not uploaded correctly so that's what I tried to do.
I download a Linux Live Disk (Knoppix) which can boot the PC on a linux OS. Already that worked, so I had keyboard and mouse control (which means that there was no hardware problem). After having read another post about which files are used to control USB, I used another old old old PC that was in XP2. I went to the Windows/System32/drivers/ folder and copied onto a USB key all the files that started with "usb" (I don't know much about computers!!!). Thanks to the Linux live disk, I could acceed my startup hard disk. I then tried to copy over the files with the ones on the USB key. This turned out to be harder than expected because the Windows NFTS disks are only readable in Linux, but not easily writable. Again, I found another forum where it explained how to get around that. I copied the files over the existing ones (SP2 files instead of SP3, about 8 files start with the letters USB). Well folks, my computer works perfectely since so thanks to the Mystic and to everyone who posted, otherwise my computer would definitely be deceased today.
Richy
Answer
+2
moins plus
WHY XP INSTALLATION STRUDK OFF AFTER COPYING ALL FILES AT THE TIME XP LOGO.MY COMPUTER HAVING 2.4 CELERON PROCEESSOR AND MORA MOTHER BOARD

Answer
+2
moins plus
Hello

your Recovery Disk may be corrupt. You can get replacement Recovery Disks to reinstall your Operating System here:

www.oemsoftwaresource.com

Good luck!

Answer
+2
moins plus
#
Step 1

Watch carefully as the computer starts up after a reboot. Select "Recovery Console" from the "Startup Options" list.
#
Step 2

Install the Windows XP disk into the drive if "Recovery Console" is not listed in "Startup Options." Restart the computer. Follow the prompts and select "Repair" or "Recover."
#
Step 3

Type the administrator password for the computer. If there is only one user on the computer, it will be that user's password.
#
Step 4

Type "cd system32" without quotes when the command prompt appears. Press "Enter," type "ren kernel32.dll kernel32.old" and press "Enter" again. Type "map" and press "Enter."
#
Step 5

Type "expand d:\i386\kernel32.dl_" and press "Enter." If the Windows XP CD is inserted into a drive other than "D:" replace "D:" with the proper drive letter.
#
Step 6

Type "exit" and press the "Enter" key. The computer will shut down and reboot again. Remove the Windows XP disk. The reboot loop should now be resolved

Read more: How to Fix a Windows XP Reboot Loop | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5004158_fix-windows-xp-reboot-loop.html#ixzz0s54wkqfX

Answer
+1
moins plus
is it possible before restart the computer all the windows files recover

Answer
+1
moins plus
Try the following. It fixes a different Windows problem but this worked for the restart loop also...



To complete part one, follow these steps:
Insert the Windows XP startup disk into the floppy disk drive, or insert the Windows XP CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive, and then restart the computer.
Click to select any options that are required to start the computer from the CD-ROM drive if you are prompted to do so.
When the "Welcome to Setup" screen appears, press R to start the Recovery Console.
If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot computer, select the installation that you want to access from the Recovery Console.
When you are prompted to do so, type the Administrator password. If the administrator password is blank, just press ENTER.
At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
md tmp
copy c:\windows\system32\config\system c:\windows\tmp\system.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\software c:\windows\tmp\software.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\sam c:\windows\tmp\sam.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\security c:\windows\tmp\security.bak
copy c:\windows\system32\config\default c:\windows\tmp\default.bak

delete c:\windows\system32\config\system
delete c:\windows\system32\config\software
delete c:\windows\system32\config\sam
delete c:\windows\system32\config\security
delete c:\windows\system32\config\default

copy c:\windows\repair\system c:\windows\system32\config\system
copy c:\windows\repair\software c:\windows\system32\config\software
copy c:\windows\repair\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam
copy c:\windows\repair\security c:\windows\system32\config\security
copy c:\windows\repair\default c:\windows\system32\config\default

Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer will restart.
Note This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step five, and then create a text file called "Regcopy1.txt" (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy1.txt
With the batch command in Recovery Console, you can process all the commands in a text file sequentially. When you use the batch command, you do not have to manually type as many commands.
Part two
To complete the procedure described in this section, you must be logged on as an administrator, or an administrative user (a user who has an account in the Administrators group). If you are using Windows XP Home Edition, you can log on as an administrative user. If you log on as an administrator, you must first start Windows XP Home Edition in Safe mode. To start the Windows XP Home Edition computer in Safe mode, follow these steps.

Note Print these instructions before you continue. You cannot view these instructions after you restart the computer in Safe Mode. If you use the NTFS file system, also print the instructions from Knowledge Base article KB309531. Step 7 contains a reference to the article.
Click Start, click Shut Down (or click Turn Off Computer), click Restart, and then click OK (or click Restart).
Press the F8 key.

On a computer that is configured to start to multiple operating systems, you can press F8 when you see the Startup menu.
Use the arrow keys to select the appropriate Safe mode option, and then press ENTER.
If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot system, use the arrow keys to select the installation that you want to access, and then press ENTER.
In part two, you copy the registry files from their backed up location by using System Restore. This folder is not available in Recovery Console and is generally not visible during typical usage. Before you start this procedure, you must change several settings to make the folder visible:
Start Windows Explorer.
On the Tools menu, click Folder options.
Click the View tab.
Under Hidden files and folders, click to select Show hidden files and folders, and then click to clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box.
Click Yes when the dialog box that confirms that you want to display these files appears.
Double-click the drive where you installed Windows XP to display a list of the folders. If is important to click the correct drive.
Open the System Volume Information folder. This folder is unavailable and appears dimmed because it is set as a super-hidden folder.

Note This folder contains one or more _restore {GUID} folders such as "_restore{87BD3667-3246-476B-923F-F86E30B3E7F8}".

Note You may receive the following error message:
C:\System Volume Information is not accessible. Access is denied.
If you receive this message, see the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article to gain access to this folder and continue with the procedure:
309531 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309531/ ) How to gain access to the System Volume Information folder
Open a folder that was not created at the current time. You may have to click Details on the View menu to see when these folders were created. There may be one or more folders starting with "RPx under this folder. These are restore points.
Open one of these folders to locate a Snapshot subfolder. The following path is an example of a folder path to the Snapshot folder:
C:\System Volume Information\_restore{D86480E3-73EF-47BC-A0EB-A81BE6EE3ED8}\RP1\Snapshot
From the Snapshot folder, copy the following files to the C:\Windows\Tmp folder:
_REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM
_REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM
Rename the files in the C:\Windows\Tmp folder as follows:
Rename _REGISTRY_USER_.DEFAULT to DEFAULT
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SECURITY to SECURITY
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SOFTWARE to SOFTWARE
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SYSTEM to SYSTEM
Rename _REGISTRY_MACHINE_SAM to SAM
These files are the backed up registry files from System Restore. Because you used the registry file that the Setup program created, this registry does not know that these restore points exist and are available. A new folder is created with a new GUID under System Volume Information and a restore point is created that includes a copy of the registry files that were copied during part one. Therefore, it is important not to use the most current folder, especially if the time stamp on the folder is the same as the current time.

The current system configuration is not aware of the previous restore points. You must have a previous copy of the registry from a previous restore point to make the previous restore points available again.

The registry files that were copied to the Tmp folder in the C:\Windows folder are moved to make sure that the files are available under Recovery Console. You must use these files to replace the registry files currently in the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder. By default, Recovery Console has limited folder access and cannot copy files from the System Volume folder.

Note The procedure described in this section assumes that you are running your computer with the FAT32 file system. For more information about how to access the System Volume Information Folder with the NTFS file system, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
309531 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/309531/ ) How to gain access to the System Volume Information folder
Part Three
In part three, you delete the existing registry files, and then copy the System Restore Registry files to the C:\Windows\System32\Config folder:
Start Recovery Console.
At the command prompt, type the following lines, pressing ENTER after you type each line:
del c:\windows\system32\config\sam

del c:\windows\system32\config\security

del c:\windows\system32\config\software

del c:\windows\system32\config\default

del c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\software c:\windows\system32\config\software

copy c:\windows\tmp\system c:\windows\system32\config\system

copy c:\windows\tmp\sam c:\windows\system32\config\sam

copy c:\windows\tmp\security c:\windows\system32\config\security

copy c:\windows\tmp\default c:\windows\system32\config\default
Note Some of these command lines may be wrapped for readability.
Type exit to quit Recovery Console. Your computer restarts.
Note This procedure assumes that Windows XP is installed to the C:\Windows folder. Make sure to change C:\Windows to the appropriate windows_folder if it is a different location.

If you have access to another computer, to save time, you can copy the text in step two, and then create a text file called "Regcopy2.txt" (for example). To use this file, run the following command when you start in Recovery Console:
batch regcopy2.txt
Part Four
Click Start, and then click All Programs.
Click Accessories, and then click System Tools.
Click System Restore, and then click Restore to a previous RestorePoint.
Back to the top



Hope this helps!

Daniel.

Answer
+1
moins plus
hi
some times this may happen cuz of bad settings of the graphic card, if so you have to enter the safe mode and change the settings.
some times bad ram could do so .

Answer
+1
moins plus
i need the solution in t0he error of windows auto matic update restart error

Answer
+1
moins plus
I own an internet cafe and i want to enable the automatically deleting of all data saved after restarting or after shut down. Please help me.

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